Disability At The Center

Disability At The Center

so Luca Luca Bonetti I become whole things and then write this a doctoral candidate and not disability studies at the University of Illinois in Chicago his work is focused on disability issues of community self-determination and inclusion he brings together as rich interdisciplinary academic background community experience and research I was teaching in clinical work these all allow them to disability holistically in its various dimensions and to serve persons with disabilities across multiple settings originally from Rome Italy Luke has obtained an MS in clinical psychology a BA in Communication Arts in theology with minors in philosophy and mental health of human services and he’s a lone eye of lend which is the leadership education and neurodevelopmental and related disabilities he has research and teaching experience at the Institute for disability and human development and has provided mental health therapy to persons with intellectual disabilities at the developmental disabilities family clinics he’s a scientific community member of a disability studies book series an advisory committee member the italian journal disability studies he’s qualified to give this signal shock throughout the years Luca has been deeply involved with the large communities in which people with and without homes of intellectual disabilities share life together in a spirit of friendship after having been a living in a live-in assistant in various US and European communities he’s currently the community coordinator for large Chicago and co-chairs and national inclusion initiatives. with that being said I’m gonna let Luca talk about he’s gonna talk about seeking I can say stop talking and hand over to him well thank you all for coming first of all it is great to see a good turnout also considering it’s been midterm season here. as you were mentioning I come from a different country I’ve been here many years and today we are going to enter together into a different country which is disability we might think that we know what disability is but we will discover that it’s something that we journey into and they were never done discovering. what happens when we go into a new country what are some things that we do first of all we observe we try to learn the language or try to get a sense of what people are saying we know these things look how they do things what they say look how they move what they eat we get glimpses but we never have a full understanding of a culture doing we get its sense but we can’t contain it into one framework. they are going to enter into disability we are going to explore its different dimensions but I hope that is something you will bring with you is more questions than answers about disability. the talk will be divided into two different segments the first segment is about accepting our disability and accepting the disability of others let’s look at the words disability I think I know what this means this this it means lacking heart. disabilities lacking of an ability. really for faithful to the world aren’t we all disabled aren’t we all unable to do something. I’d start with this understanding of disability the disability is the place in us within us where we are they lack and black is great black is great we live in a culture that doesn’t always say that laugh is great when we think about success we often refer to having it all together or knowing how to do something there is therefore a sense that our strength is what define us you see in bookstores in training programs you know the seven ways to be effective and to be successful they’re always numbered but I’ve come to discover is that lack is what makes us most human because because when we have a life we can ask people to help us we can come together if we add it all together if we were all able to do everything we wouldn’t need one another in somebody individualism in Western culture is kind of based on that assumption learn more cheap more you know you can do it and you can do it usually means you individual not you Isaac the second part of our talk will examine disability shortly across history and we learn a bit why this baby has been marginalized and rejected. we go back to black I just said that light brings us together I cannot do this I need you in some way this is part of our human history when we go back to four historic times and we go back to the Neanderthal people they’ve made an interesting discovery this was made in the 1950s they found graves tombs of Neanderthal people in amongst these stools there was one with a with the skeleton of a man who was in his around 40 years old he lived about 100,000 years back they realized that he worked he didn’t have he lived in an impaired way he didn’t have an eye he was crippled and he couldn’t feed himself he couldn’t go out and gather food now you know in primitive times not being able to go out and get food was a problem that’s actually with the survival of the fittest mentality comes from you know just go how big yourself and you know if you cannot do it you basically die off well but they found out that this wasn’t the case and they found a skeleton some people made this with disbelief the like that’s not possible that they were doing them at those times but then I found out other tombs and they realized that there were people with disabilities back then and then the group got food for them and took care of them. this was a culture of care not as the culture of survival. instead of survival of the fittest I like to think of survival of care our ancestry of care in our own humanity we know though the true history this wasn’t always the case with people with disabilities they’ve often been rejected and often being oppressed they’ve often been eliminated we will talk about that a little more in just a bit however through time there have been people there have been families there have been groups that have taken a step towards welcoming people with disabilities rather than rejecting them one of these groups started in the 1960s in France this is when a Canadian philosopher named Jean Vanier visited an institution for people with intellectual disabilities this was north of Paris in a small French town as he walk to this institution he heard a cry from people there do you want to be my friend am i important to me remember these are people they were locked up in an institution j’onn was touched by this call by these questions and he decided to invite two of these people to live with him to open up a house and live in community away from the institutional walls but in a family style home. the two people that he invited their names were a silent feeling they started living together in a spirit of friendship they cook together they worked together then a spiritual life that they shared together was son realized is that their cry for friendship was his own crime that it was a very basic human need to love and to be loved people from around the world started to become interested in this new model of living disability and with disability and they took large communities across the globe I’m now involved with a large sacado community but there is two stories from large that I wanted to share with you tonight people with disabilities in large are called core members core meaning heart because they’re at the heart of community. I live in one of the large homes with Jimmy who is a man with Down syndrome it was a very friendly guy and a lover of music he loved country music and Celine Dion. it was a lot of Celine going on on Sunday mornings I live right across from him. could hear the whole soundtrack he was very affectionate and you really accepted and celebrated me. one time I go out on vacation for a couple of weeks and I come back to the home it was called Ghandi house I come back to the home and Jimmy comes gives me a hug and asks me did you miss me did you miss me now we used to get the courage to say I missed you you know when we are gone we come back to our family our friends our loved ones it mister I missed you but can we be vulnerable enough to say did you miss me which basically means am i important to you was it different here without let’s poke to me very deep if prop me in touch with a vulnerable place not only that he had but at I had the second story that comes to my mind is with Mike who is a core member here at large Chicago and when I asked him about you know what disability mind to him he said disability something good it is something not to fear that’s how I was made I like myself speaking of self-acceptance since the web was made with a disobeyed and I’m proud to be Who I am I like myself. what I learned in Lars by being close to people with disabilities is to accept people and to accept my own vulnerability my own need and the fact that it’s okay that I belong together in some way this is an encounter that actions in community there was an existentialist philosopher Martin Buber you know that spoke about encounter how do we meet the world how do we meet people he says there are two there are two main ways in which we can encounter people I involve me and you that which we meet people in their uniqueness in their personhood tell me your story tell me where you come from and in the relationship there changed because relationships affect us if you had a child if you have ever been in love you probably know that relationship influencing your thoughts your desires it wants the second way is I 1/8 that’s when we meet the world and people as an object according to our own labels according to our categories. in this case the crease of disability we can permit people I say it all right the disability. in our course this means that you know you your IQ is lower when you cannot do this things etc according to our frameworks or we can meet people as a vow as a you you are unique with your story yet your abilities yet their disabilities know what they are. this is where community is in meeting people through relationship society however trans disability as an act as an object people with disabilities it’s a big group it’s a big label how was this label form think about this words in a language always is a lot about the culture think about these words that job was lame that event and equipping effectively that’s retarded but as they say these terms that are often employed what does it say about disability it says that it’s better than sad these are not positive connotations they say that joke was lame that Anna crippling effect on me but it’s retarded that’s not positive and. it’s interesting odds when people imply the disability is necessarily painful you know this person is confined to a wheelchair I mean confined we will try to type in in prison or that person suffers from Down syndrome that person with Down syndrome is happy it’s not suffering from Down syndrome but the language employee emphasizes this point of bad and sad a look at history kind of makes this come alive in Greek or Roman times.

Greek and Roman civilization infanticide was advocated for people with disabilities people with impairments Aristotle proposed that not in a law he advocated for Allah saying that no different child should live disability was always was also seen as a punishment from angry gods basically the god the gods are angry you know too bad for you regret disability with the advent of judaism and christianity infanticide was prohibited and there was an emphasis towards caring for people with disabilities towards the middle ages. it’s the Middle Ages people with disabilities where I use as a spectacle for public entertainment in fairs that were displayed in villages you know in fairs and kind of look at them with amusement we then have the Scientific Revolution an Enlightenment during this time we have the courage to emphasizes reason over unreason the power of the mind disability disobey these were also also began to be diagnosed this is a time in which the first medical classification of mental disorders was created in the late 18-hundreds. abnormality became something to be diagnosed and cured actually towards the end of the century daniel said in industrialization if you were not able to work it would basically be left out of social products which brings into question the role of the economic systems in disabling people and excluding them anyway in the 19th century statistics rose when we saw you know something about statistics can be very useful for the first time at first statistics started to to study policies related to civic life in the state but for the first time KTLA who was a French astronomer and supposition used statistics to study human characteristics hide and what happens when you put statistics study human characteristics is that you have ever heard right this is the average right here on top. if we put together all the characteristic hides weight whatever of people in this country we will get an average what happened it happened that the average became the ideal when you see somebody who’s very tall over your suppose somebody who might be a little person you see we think that average is the Lord is the ideal and thus that’s what Leonard Davis called the tyranny of normalization average equals normal equals ideal this is a bit different from the classic idea of the ideal you know we see in classic times you know Venus for example note this body and you know that at the time was considered sort of ideal and imperfect but it was never meant to be something that a general population would aspire to you know these people were close to the God and you know it was sort of a very idealistic image everyone fell short of it but with this a few people fall short a few people that are not included in that backwards that we were talking about with the 20th century statistics was also used to find people’s IQ he was used to measure intelligence it has been used to classify disability you notice one thing here it is been performed by professionals right of course many doctors of crispiness and transitions but people would disappear we’ve not been involved in any of this they were labeled by ours others told them that your accused is low well guess what your disability you’re different you’re not in the average here of course well this time some people some disability sometimes we’re kept in the homes with the families sometimes in or the poor houses out houses sometimes they were closed up in institutions what happens in the 1960s well you probably heard of the civil rights movements you know in the Midlands speaking about 50 60s the civil rights movement movement women of blacks but it was also a civil right movement of people with disabilities that is still continuing to this day. the debate or the discussion is kind of switched from disability is foreign sad to I’m proud to be disabled as a person with disability I have rights that everyone else does I am a citizen like everyone else is. you notice how the conversation has been shaped however as one researcher noted people with disabilities still tend to be outside looking in I’m thinking especially of people with intellectual disabilities where are they where are they my live I mean I live in a community. I see them I enjoy living with them but they’re away from the places where culture is made their experience is not asked for their expertise is not solved which is very interesting because they can be those they can be those people that can help us and our society grow into humanity which means it’s okay your reasoning or your intellectual disabilities are not perfect but we can relate at the level of the heart where I can say I need you and you need me we come together beyond walls. people with disabilities are still outside looking in yes there is been a great advance that has been made towards including that more all right sometimes you see that new supermarket do new things in the back which is nice but the richness of their having a disability it’s not necessarily recognized which is very interesting you know if I told you you know often times when I said that I studied disability or that I share life with people with disabilities what I hear is that’s nice yeah it’s okay great but you know if I if you know if if I said you know I work to end racism that’s right I work for less discrimination towards women that is right it’s the right thing to do but we dissipated that’s right it’s more that’s nice hopefully we tried there will be people who recognize that it’s right to include people with disabilities in the center until share life together in whatever ways we can of it’s not everybody not everyone joining in an intentional community or divorce it’s interesting still today a lot of these scores are on disability I mean if we seen movies for commercials or stuff that’s very interesting people with disabilities are often seen as the little angels I often give people to say that or they’re always had be people with Down syndrome are always happy in your own right wonder was about to church in Italy once because it was upset he took people just like you and me turn on evil angels the other extreme is to see them as animals which kind of happens unconsciously to some people look they cannot even eat for themselves that’s. sad people with disabilities and neither Angels nor animals they’re people when swimmy. it’s very interesting to hear where discourses go what culture is going and to encourage it where people with disabilities right at the center because they remind us of what it means to be human there in mindless day we don’t have it all together but it needs okay if we are together beyond walls thank you